Thursday, December 8, 2016

Digital Foundations - Challenges CIOs must embrace

When building anything substantial, such as a house or bridge, you start by laying down a solid foundation.

Nothing changes this aspect of building brick by brick when you move from traditional constructions to application development and architecting your supporting infrastructure. Throw in Cloud terminology and you might think that the principles of a solid foundation are a bit flighty, but nothing is further from the truth.

When looking to manage an organizations journey into their digital future, CIOs are dealing with a lot of challenges. Challenges that they face on the road to digital transformation can be daunting as first glance, but must be embraced to properly navigate the road to success.

Digital foundations

Let's take a look in this first article at the challenges CIOs must embrace before diving into how to support digital aspirations. After that, we dig deeper into what a solid foundation based on open technologies looks like and how it can help you to deliver on several themes that support your digital journey:
  • fixing slow delivery of existing solutions
  • reducing the complexity in current infrastructure
  • increasing the agility in delivering customer solutions
  • providing scalable foundations for an eventual hybrid cloud solution
  • paving the road to your cloud solutions
The first step is to examine some of the challenges to be embraced on the road to building a solid digital foundation for your organization.

Challenges to embrace

The challenges faced when building your digital foundations starts with knowing your business environment, understanding the need to become a software company and that your competition is everywhere.

All parts of your organization are under pressure, from business to developer to operations. Current delivery of solutions is struggling to keep within budgets, on time and with enough value to compete in your markets.

Businesses are looking to DevOps and the Cloud for solutions to provide better deployment quality, faster release frequencies and more process visibility. The term was coined by Gartner is Bi-modal IT. It describes the approach of two modes of delivery for IT, one focused on agility and speed and the other on stability and accuracy.

The challenges in building this foundation to address Bi-modal IT balance in your organization are split into mode-1 where you find your existing applications facing slow delivery and your current infrastructure has or is becoming too complex to manage. In the mode-2 category, you find cloud native applications struggling to become agile enough to be relevant and cloud infrastructure struggling to find the necessary scalability for your organization.


The story continues...  stay tuned for more on building the foundations of digital transformation where we look at fixing the slow delivery of existing solutions in an organization.

Monday, December 5, 2016

App Dev in the Cloud: How To Run JBoss BRMS in a Container

Containerized JBoss Business Rules Management System!
I have a series of articles where I explore with you the reasons why application developers can't ignore their stacks anymore, which refers to the Cloud based infrastructures they working in their daily jobs.

This led to my explorations of the possibility to create that Cloud based infrastructure locally as a substitution for the full blown Red Hat Cloud Suite experience.

What would be nice I thought, was to have some form of local private Cloud that was just the same as what you are experiencing at work where full data centers are used to host an organizations Cloud experience.

First, make sure you have installed the
OpenShift Container Platform.
This led first to an example project that installs Red Hat OpenShift Enterprise (OSE) as an image through the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK).

Next, I gave you the JBoss BRMS installation example for use on OSE. This was a perfectly fine way to work, but the ultimate goal is of course to keep up with the latest products that Red Hat provides.

With that in mind I went off looking for a way to provide you with Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP), in the same easy to use demo format. The results of that project was presented in a previous article, but that is not the end of this story.

Containerize JBoss Business Rules Management System (BRMS)

Once you have installed OpenShift on your machine, either the Red Hat CDK or OCP, then the next step is to start exploring your application development options with Red Hat JBoss middleware products.

This section will take you through another simple to install example project that gives you a fully operational, fresh out of the box installation of JBoss BRMS. Not only that, it will be a containerized installation that is created on your OpenShift installation!

  1. First ensure you have an OpenShift container based installation, such as one of the following installed first:
    Watch the container building live on OpenShift
    Container Platform.
  2. Add products to installs directory.
  3. Run 'init.sh' or 'init.bat' file. 'init.bat' must be run with Administrative privileges:
   # The installation needs to be pointed to a running version
   # of OpenShift, so pass an IP address such as:
   #
   $ ./init.sh 192.168.99.100  # example for OCP.

   $ ./init.sh 10.1.2.2        # example for CDK.
Now log in to JBoss BRMS and start developing containerized rules projects (the address will be generated by the init script).
The pod shown which is your JBoss BRMS container on
OpenShift Container Platform.
Be sure to give the container time to not only start up, but to start up JBoss EAP with JBoss BRMS. You can check this by finding the deployed pod in the OpenShift console and looking into the logs tab.

That's it, you are now able to start developing business logic and events at your leisure.

Stay tuned for more by watching for updates here or following the projects at Red Hat Demo Central.


Monday, November 28, 2016

App Dev in the Cloud: How To Run JBoss BPM Suite in a Container

Containerized JBoss BPM Suite!
I have a series of articles where I explore with you the reasons why application developers can't ignore their stacks anymore, which refers to the Cloud based infrastructures they working in their daily jobs.

This led to my explorations of the possibility to create that Cloud based infrastructure locally as a substitution for the full blown Red Hat Cloud Suite experience.

What would be nice I thought, was to have some form of local private Cloud that was just the same as what you are experiencing at work where full data centers are used to host an organizations Cloud experience.

First, make sure you have installed the
OpenShift Container Platform.
This led first to an example project that installs Red Hat OpenShift Enterprise (OSE) as an image through the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK).

Next, I gave you the JBoss BPM Suite installation example for use on OSE. This was a perfectly fine way to work, but the ultimate goal is of course to keep up with the latest products that Red Hat provides.

With that in mind I went off looking for a way to provide you with Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP), in the same easy to use demo format. The results of that project was presented in a previous article, but that is not the end of this story.

Containerize JBoss Business Process Management Suite

Once you have installed OpenShift on your machine, either the Red Hat CDK or OCP, then the next step is to start exploring your application development options with Red Hat JBoss middleware products.

This section will take you through another simple to install example project that gives you a fully operational, fresh out of the box installation of JBoss BPM Suite. Not only that, it will be a containerized installation that is created on your OpenShift installation!

  1. First ensure you have an OpenShift container based installation, such as one of the following installed first:
  2. Add products to installs directory.
  3. Run 'init.sh' or 'init.bat' file. 'init.bat' must be run with Administrative privileges:
   # The installation needs to be pointed to a running version
   # of OpenShift, so pass an IP address such as:
   #
   $ ./init.sh 192.168.99.100  # example for OCP.

   $ ./init.sh 10.1.2.2        # example for CDK.
Now log in to JBoss BPM Suite and start developing containerized BPM projects (the address will be generated by the init script).
The pod shown which is your JBoss BPM Suite container
on OpenShift Container Platform.
Be sure to give the container time to not only start up, but to start up JBoss EAP with JBoss BPM Suite. You can check this by finding the deployed pod in the OpenShift console and looking into the logs tab.

That's it, you are now able to start developing business logic and events at your leisure.

Stay tuned for more by watching for updates here or following the projects at Red Hat Demo Central.


Thursday, November 24, 2016

How To Setup Integration & SOA Tooling For JBoss Developer Studio 10

The release of the latest JBoss Developer Studio (JBDS) brings with it the questions around how to get started with the various JBoss Integration and BPM product tool sets that are not installed out of the box.

In this series of articles we will outline for you how to install each set of tools and explain which products they are supporting.

This should help you in making an informed decision about what tooling you might want to install before embarking on your next JBoss integration project.

There are four different software packs that offer tooling for various JBoss integration products:
  1. JBoss Integration and SOA Development
  2. JBoss Data Virtualization Development
  3. JBoss Business Process and Rules Development
  4. JBoss Fuse Development
Tooling is available under software updates
with early access enabled.
This article will outline how to get started with the JBoss integration and SOA development tooling and any of the JBDS 10 series of releases.

Installation

JBDS 10 can be obtained through the Customer Portal or via the early access downloads on jboss.org. After installing JBDS, start it up and you will see a welcoming JBoss Central tab with at the bottom a tab to look at the available tool sets labeled Software/Update

You will notice at the time of this writing that there are no other JBoss Integration stacks offered to install upon first inspection. This is due to the other integration stacks being early access.

Select JBoss Integration and SOA Development.
Eventually they will be shown by default once testing finished and they release, but for now you can obtain them by checking the Early Access box in the bottom right corner. 

This will reveal the integration stack tooling offerings and we will select JBoss Integration and SOA Development.

Click on the Install/Update button to start the installation and restart at the end to complete the process.

If you are interested in what is being installed, it can be examined by examining the pop-up listing of components and versions. Note this will change as the early access progresses towards final releases.
    Examine components and versions to be installed.
    Stay tuned for more articles in this series that will detail the installation of the remaining JBoss Integration Stack tools.

    Other options

    In the past we have outlined the use of JBoss BPM and rules tooling for other versions of JBDS:
    [Note: This post was originally published on Red Hat Developers, the community to learn, code, and share faster. Original article here.]

    Monday, November 21, 2016

    3 Steps to Cloud Happiness with OpenShift Container Platform

    There is no easier way to install your very own Cloud than with OpenShift Container Platform.

    Bold statement you say?

    Not really, just tag along as I show you how to move from no Cloud to fully Cloud enabled with a container based application development platform in just over two minutes.

    Wait... that's crazy!

    Get a stopwatch and get your coffee before you start because you won't have enough time to get it during this installation.

    Figure 1. Automated version checks for requirements.
    If you have been following my journey through the application development phases of storytelling, you will have seen that I was an early fan of Cloud based solutions like OpenShift. This was a way to take your application development from your local resources and move them onto a remote set of resources, while continuing to work locally as you always have.

    I took some time this last year to push my JBoss middleware example applications on to the Red Hat Container Development Platform (CDK), which is based on the OpenShift Enterprise Platform (OSE). The latest iteration of this product has been named the OpenShift Container Platform (OCP), so I have been working hard to bring you an even better experience for your local private Cloud installation.

    Today I present this work to you in the form of a project called the OpenShift Container Platform Install Demo. It is so simple, I believe that anyone can set this up in just over two minutes. Let's take a look, as it it only a three step process:

    Install in 3 simple steps...

    1. Figure 2. Container images pulled to your box.
      Download and unzip.
    2. Run 'init.sh', then sit back.
    3. Follow displayed instructions to log in to your brand new OpenShift Container Platform!

    You need to download and unzip the project, then run the installation script, sit back until you see the output at the end showing you where to log in to your brand new OpenShift Container Platform.

    Figure 3. The JBoss product templates
    are installed from their image streams.
    Figure 1 shows how I will check if you have the required tools installed, if not you will get a pointer to where you need to download these requirements. This means you don't have to worry about finding out what you need, just run the installation and it will tell you where to get anything that is missing.

    Also note, that if you have run this installation before, it's setup to always give you a clean running installation by fixing anything that is left running or blocking an installation. Not intervention needed by you.

    In figure 2 you see the installation starting, where the container layers are being pulled into your machine and setup.

    Validation is shown in figure 3, where the IP address of your OCP login console is presented. I then make sure your OCP has the latest greatest JBoss middleware streams loaded and update the RHEL 7 streams.

    Now you are almost ready, just need to show you how to log in.

    Figure 4 shows the address that was dynamically created (in my case it is showing https://192.168.99.100:8443), just paste it into your browser and you can log in with any of the given users. Also note that you might want to completely clean up this demo by running the command shown, or just shut it down for now as shown.
    Figure 4. Final installation details given.

    As I have updated the image streams, it will take some time for them to be pulled into your OCP and appear in your lists of available platforms. Log in with admin user and you will see that you need to create a project, just click on the New Project button.

    You can fill in the form shown in figure 5 any way you like, but I chose to line it up as the project that will soon host all my Red Hat Cloud demo projects.

    Once you submit that form, you are presented with an overview of the product templates for your projects that I installed above (remember, it might take a few minutes for them all to appear, so take a sip of coffee now as it is your only chance in this process).

    You can now start using the catalog containing the JBoss middleware product templates to develop applications on the OCP Cloud.

    This concludes the installation of OpenShift Container Platform and you are now ready to start containerized application development. I assume you can find more information online if you are interested in getting started with the basics of container development on OCP, so I won't go into that here.
    Figure 5. Fill in a new project form as desired.

    Stay tuned, there will be a move to provide the same demo collection that is currently available on the Red Hat CDK. I am working on getting them all running on the OCP install you have just experienced, so watch for updates to the examples collection at Red Hat Demo Central.

    Not only that, these example middleware applications will be able to run either on the Red Hat CDK or on OCP, your choice!

    Here's wishing you many happy days of containerized application development in the Cloud!

    Thursday, November 17, 2016

    Codemotion Rome 2017: Last try for Containers, JBoss BPM and Monkeys

    I have spoken in the past at Codemotion Rome, and in Denmark,  so this year I have submitted a few talks in hopes of spending a few days with the good people that host these conferences.

    From my new position at Red Hat I have a broader reach on the topics and technology that I can choose from to submit, so the sessions below you will find are pretty far apart on the technology spectrum.

    Fingers crossed and maybe I will see you at Codemotion Rome on  24-25th of March 2017 for any of the following talks.

    Painless containerization in your very own Private Cloud

    As application developers we are coming to grips with new technology all the time. Containerizing what we do is becoming the standard as our applications are delivered into the Cloud. Let me show you a painless way to easily install a private Cloud in just minutes, one that leverages today's docker based container technologies from & wrapped in a developer friendly self-service OpenShift platform. 

    Join me for an hour of power where you will walk away with the ability to leverage real hands-on example applications of painless containerization in your very own private OpenShift Cloud platform.


    App Dev in the Cloud: Not my circus, not my monkey...

    When faced with all the hype around Cloud, most application developers are not really all that excited. Maybe you get that feeling that it isn't your problem, just leave me to my applications. Let me show you why, as an application developer, you can't ignore your Cloud stack anymore. 

    We will examine your Cloud stack anxieties and provide you with a solutions to ease you into your first private PaaS on your own local machine that you can install in just minutes. Finally you will be given a myriad of examples to take home with you to take control of this circus and own the monkeys!


    Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM

    When getting started with JBoss BPM you are often looking for a reference to help you on your journey, something that will make you an effective member of your project team that is developing process applications. 

    I will present an overview of how to get started, where you can find the help you need and leave you a collection of example projects that you can install locally on your development machine or in the Cloud. 

    Join us for an hour of power that will turn you into a productive BPM'er and send you home with early access to the publication of the same name.